Steelite acquires William Edwards

Steelite says move strengthens their position in luxury tableware sector

Steelite International has acquired William Edwards Limited. The announcement comes following Arbor’s acquisition of Steelite International, announced in December of 2019, fuelling Steelite’s expansion and global product offerings.

William Edwards Limited, founded in 1993 by William Edwards in Stoke-on-Trent, is known globally for its fine bone china servicing famous brands across the world. This includes collaborations with Michelin-star chefs like Brett Graham and Tom Kerridge to design stunning yet practical tableware collections. Their excellent reputation in servicing four and five-star hotels is second to none and includes a roster of high profile customers, including Jumeirah, Rosewood London, Claridge’s, Four Seasons Hotel, The Connaught, The Dorchester, and the Historic Royal Palaces.

“We are so pleased to welcome William Edwards and his team at WE Limited to Steelite International,” said John Miles, President, and CEO, Steelite International. “Our goal with all our iconic brands is to provide customers with exceptional quality, creative design, and unparalleled service; William Edwards is a perfect fit!”
“WE Ltd are very excited to be joining Steelite International,” said William Edwards. “We see this as the perfect fit for our ambitions of future worldwide brand growth. The combination of Steelite International’s unrivaled global reach, with both of our U.K. based factories in Stoke-on-Trent working in unison, will undoubtedly allow our passion and creativity in tableware to thrive in the future.”
The acquisition of William Edwards Limited will strengthen Steelite’s position in the luxury tableware sector, while at the same time powering William Edward’s growth in the development, design, and manufacturing of luxury dinnerware. Both Steelite and William Edwards will continue to operate from their current facilities in Stoke-on-Trent, the heartland of England’s ceramics industry, since the late 1700s.